CPD Project – High Attainers

These sessions provided a good opportunity to reflect on our current practice and to share some ideas. Over the three sessions, we considered:

  • Would a new G&T register useful?
  • Do we do enough to celebrate high attainers?
  • What does good classroom practice look like?
  • What do CATs scores mean?

Our conclusions about good classroom practice were very much in agreement with the following article (initially discovered by Sue Strachan). If you’re interested in improving your approach with high attaining students, I would recommend giving it a read:

https://teacherhead.com/2017/05/28/teaching-to-the-top-attitudes-and-strategies-for-delivering-real-challenge/

As part of our second session I taught a little Maths lesson, introducing the group to one of the “low threshold, high ceiling” tasks that we regularly use in Maths at Churchill. The idea of these tasks is summarised in the article below. The article also contains links to some lovely tasks that you could try yourself!

https://nrich.maths.org/7701

Inevitably, with the session being led by a Maths teacher, we talked a lot about data. Since CATs data are often used to identify high attaining students, we considered what CATs scores actually mean: is 110 a high score? How about 120? CATs data are an example of “standardised scores”. In our final session we looked at how to use “standardised scores” to track student progress. I would very much recommend the following two videos (because I made them):

Standardised Scores – What do they mean?

https://youtu.be/7ky9MBCcubo

Measuring Progress Using Standardised Scores

https://youtu.be/JoYtWPxzrXM

I think these videos would be especially useful to anybody who needs to measure the progress of students across whole year groups.

Elliot Malkin

 

One thought on “CPD Project – High Attainers

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s